Man holding a gold barGold will always be a sought after metal and a safe investment of your wealth. Due to its timeless quality and lasting brilliance, gold bars are held as gold reserves by central banks as well as by private investors.

If you have ever seen gold bars for sale in the UK, you will likely come across a beautiful woman holding a large, fruit filled horn, stamped upon its surface. This mysterious figure is Fortuna, the Roman Goddess of wealth and luck.

The Myth of Fortuna

Fortuna is a Roman Goddess, adapted from the ancient Greek goddess Tyche. She was a prominent fertility deity in ancient times and was a bearer of prosperity and good fortune. Indeed, the word ‘fortune’ derives from the word Fortuna.

Fortuna was also a goddess of divination. It was common for ancient people to consult her whenever they needed guidance. Oracles, a type of ancient priestess, or enlightened people, sought her help to catch a glimpse into what the future may bring. Due to her power to bring wealth and prosperity into people’s lives, she was worshipped extensively across ancient Rome. There were hundreds of cults that revered her as their primary goddess.

The Cornucopia

Fortuna is almost always depicted with the Cornucopia in hand. The Cornucopia is also known as the Horn of Plenty, and was continuously brimming with flowers, fruit and corn. In Greek mythology, the Cornucopia was the horn of Amalthea, a divine goat that nourished the god Zeus while he was an infant. It was said that Zeus was so strong that he accidentally broke Amalthea’s horns while playing with her. The horn fell to the ground and began sprouting an endless amount of fruit and flowers.

No one is quite sure when Fortuna started carrying the Cornucopia, but this depiction of her has since become one of the most enduring symbols of wealth and prosperity. The Fortuna symbol was eventually adopted in coinage and gold bars.

Considering Fortuna’s ties with wealth and prosperity, it was only fitting that she be a prominent figure on bullion.